Talks

TCS Talk | In Search of the Female Mythological Figure | October 4th 2019

2.54, 50 George Square, Edinburgh |  16:30-19:00 (roughly)
Friday 4th October

The Traditional Cosmology Society inaugurates its 2019-20 season of talks by presenting a lecture by Jelka Vince Pallua, formerly from the University of Zagreb, and currently affiliated with the Institute of Social Sciences Ivo Pilar, Zagreb.

Professor Vince Pallua is a ethnologist and scholar of mythology whose interests have long encompassed the position of women in traditional cultures (see, e.g. her recent book The Enigma of Sworn Virgins, 2014), as well as issues of Croatian and Slavic ethnography; Mediterranean studies and traditional cultures of the Adriatic; Morovlachs and the phenomenon of morlachism; Croats in Italy and Italians in Croatia.

In her lecture, Professor Vince Pallua will draw upon a number of recent studies from the Croation context, to illustrate how an increasing number of areas in Croatia have been scientifically identified as sites where pre-Christian Croats left vestiges of their most sacred mythical events. In particular, her lecture will focus on the Proto-Slavic divine trilogy (the gods Perun, Veles and the goddess Mokosh), and present instances in which Mokosh appear to have been substituted by the mythical character Baba (the word ‘baba’ in some Slavic languages indicates a hag, ugly old woman).

Prof Vince Pallua will discuss two figurative representations of Baba, the only ones in figurative form known to-date, which she herself discovered in Istria, the southwestern part of Croatia. In Vince Pallua’s view, 15th century Croats in Istria kept alive the memory of the supreme Proto-Slavic goddess Mokosh, herself a female deity of fertility and the patron of female chores and craft (especially spinning and weaving), eventually incorporating Mokosh’s mythological legacy into Marian veneration.

 

Vince Pallua 2019 Poster

 

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TCS Talk | Keepers of the Universe | March 22nd 2019

G.05, 50 George Square, Edinburgh |  17:30-19:00
Friday 22nd March

On Friday March 22nd, Dr Lucie Vinsova will give a public lecture entitled ‘Keepers of the Universe’. Dr Visnova is a Czech scholar hailing from Masaryk University in Brno, and has conducted fieldwork with various indigenous communities living in Colombia, both in the mountainous areas of the South West and in the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta, in the North.

In her lecture, Dr Vinsova will describe the special relationship these ethnic groups have with water. She will explain how indigenous communities in those areas have always appreciated the crucial role played by water in ensuring the well-being of their society and life in general. Indeed, the notion of human responsibility in managing such precious resource can be traced in a number of water-related myths: Dr Visnova will provide insight into various mythological and cosmological motifs, all linked to the importance of water.

She will also comment on more recent developments, however. With páramos (alpine tundra ecosystems, which constitute the main source of water in the Colombian Andean areas) now continuously threatened by mining industries, and with climate- and civilization- related changes altering the delicate cycle of water, members of those communities – she will argue – are increasingly struggling to fulfil their cultural obligations as “Keepers of the Universe”.

 

Vinsova - Keepers of the Universe

TCS Talk | The Meaning of Maya Myths | March 23rd 2018

THE MEANING OF MAYA MYTHS

G.01, 50 George Square, Edinburgh |  17:30-19:00
Friday 23rd March

In his lecture, Professor Aleksandar Bošković will examine the ways in which the Classic Maya have been studied, and the issue of whether it is possible to trace any analogies with the present-day Maya. The Classic Maya built a fascinating civilization, whose belief-system centred on in the inevitability of change, as well as on a complex set of deities and spirits. The rulers had a special place in this microcosm, as they were believed to be direct descendants of the deities responsible for each city-state. Recent advancements in the decipherment of ancient Maya writing have enabled us to gain unprecedented insights into the structure and organization of their societies and spiritual tenets.

Aleksandar Bošković is Professor of Anthropology at the University of Belgrade (Serbia) and at the UDG (Montenegro), and Director of Research at the Institute of Social Sciences in Belgrade. He has an MA in Anthropology from Tulane University (New Orleans), and a PhD in Social Anthropology from the University of St Andrews. He is the author or editor of thirteen books, including Mesoamerican Religions and Archaeology (Oxford, 2017), Individualism (Belgrade, 2017), and Other Peoples’ Anthropologies (New York, 2008)

Meaning of Maya Myths poster small.jpg

TCS Talk | Itinerancy and Afterlife | February 2nd 2018

G.05, 50 George Square, Edinburgh | 17:30-19:00
Friday 2nd February 2018

Professor Peter Jackson is director of History of religions at the Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender studies at Stockholm University. He specialises in the philological study of Indo-European religions, with a special emphasis on ancient Indian and Iranian religions, the religions of ancient Greece and Rome, and Old Norse religion. He has also undertaken the daunting comparative task of exploring how recurrences in the earliest cultic and heroic poetry of ancient India, Iran, Greece, and the Germanic world may provide clues to the common past of these traditions.

In his lecture, Prof. Jackson will examine the mutual dependence between a rudimentary warrior elite and increasingly specialized suppliers of ritual in proto Indo European society. He will explore deep layers of comparative evidence, in order to demonstrate the means by which patron-client relationships in ancient Greece, pre-Achaemenid Iran, and Vedic India paved the way for new notions and sensibilities, including theoretical means of living and the promise of a happy afterlife. Special attention will be drawn to the names and mythical characterizations of Orpheus and the Vedic so-called R̥bhus (r̥bhú- [pl. r̥bhávaḥ]) as idealized projections of the itinerant poet-priest.

TCS Talk | Michal Schwarz | 1st December 2017

Location: Meadows Lecture Theatre, Old Medical School, Teviot Place, Edinburgh.
Date: Fri 01/12/2017
Time:    17:45 – 19:00

Speaker: Michal Schwarz (Masaryk University, Czech Republic)

The Moon in Selected East Asian Folk Tales.  Cosmologies and deities of the moon in selected East Asian languages, traditions and folk tales

Michal’s lecture will focus on examples of folk tales from less known variants of East Asian traditions: for example, a cosmogonic local tale from the Korean Jeju island, and then ethnic Vietnamese and Mường folk tales about deities of the moon. Beside the cosmological complexity of topics in these relatively brief folk tales, the lecture will deal with the historical development of the respective religious traditions through selected theonyms and their use. Finally, Michal will compare Vietnamese syncretic motifs with their counterparts in Indian and Chinese source-traditions.

Michal_Schwarz_poster_draft_small

Forthcoming Talk

Guercino_-_Personification_of_Astrology_-_circa_1650-1655

The Astrological Worldview’

Dr Jane Ridder-Patrick

Thursday 3 December 2015
Main Lecture Theatre, Edinburgh College of Art (Old Building)

Start time: 5.00pm

 

 

Astrology – the astronomical_clockcorrelation of events and movements in the heavens with events and qualities on earth – has been practised by every major civilisation since time immemorial and despite being banished from Western mainstream culture in the late seventeenth century it still flourishes today, albeit as a marginalised practice. This talk will investigate the secret of astrology’s tenacity and explore the astrological worldview, demonstrating how it has been used over the years and some of its present day applications.